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CEO: Mrs G Coffey OBE

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Curriculum Overview - Year 6

Our curriculum covers a broad range of subjects which allows the children to learn in a wide range of styles combining core and foundation subjects. Each day children have core Maths and English lessons, which are taught in ability sets to allow the children to follow a more personalised programme of study geared toward their individual targets, based on the new national curriculum as introduced in 2014. These lessons, along with Guided Reading and Extended Writing sessions, are intended to develop children’s basic skills which are integral to their success as a learner, and will allow them to access all areas of the curriculum.

New for this year, the children will be following the International Primary Curriculum (IPC) to cover topics in Science, Geography, History and Art. Each unit of work is based around a theme and promotes thinking skills through the 8 personal goals: adaptability, enquiry, respect, resilience, communication, co-operation, morality and thoughtfulness.

All children are also given the opportunity to explore British values and culture, in the context of school community and global citizenship.

We know that children learn best from having exciting challenges that nurture their creative abilities and we strive to provide them with such activities. Lessons allow for the children to develop as creative thinkers, speakers, readers and writers. Pupils are taught to: listen and respond to adults and peers, ask relevant questions and articulate and justify their own ideas and opinions, speak audibly and fluently in a wide range of settings and with an ever increasing command of Standard English.

Maths, English and Science all follow a specific curriculum to help children develop key foundational skills. Whenever possible, children are given opportunities to develop their investigative skills within these lessons.

Download the Summer 2017 curriculum map here

English

Reading (word study and comprehension)

  • Read and discuss an increasingly wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books and short texts.
  • Read books and texts structured in different ways, and read for a range of purposes.
  • Increase familiarity with a range of books, including myths, legends and traditional stories, modern fiction, fiction from our literary heritage, and books from other cultures and traditions.
  • Learn a wider range of poetry by heart.
  • Prepare poems and plays to read aloud and perform.
  • Prepare and perform readings with appropriate intonation to show their understanding. Gain, maintain and monitor the interest of the listener(s).
  • Develop a deep understanding of texts and be able to express opinions about them. Locate evidence to support views.
  • Make comparisons within and across books.
  • Identify and discuss themes and conventions across a wide range of writing.
  • Discuss and evaluate author’s use of language, considering impact on the reader.
  • Our pupils are encouraged to read widely and frequently and enjoy language and recommend reading material to their peers, giving reasons for their choices.
  • Ask questions to improve understanding.
  • Make predictions from details stated and implied.
  • Summarise main ideas and identify key details.
  • Work out unfamiliar words using known strategies.
  • Apply growing knowledge of root words to support understanding of new words they come across.

Writing (composition and handwriting)

  • Identify the audience and purpose of the writing when tackling pieces.
  • Plan effectively, noting and developing initial ideas and drawing on reading experiences.
  • In writing narratives, consider how authors studied have developed characters and settings.
  • Select appropriate grammar and increasingly challenging vocabulary when writing and understand how choices can enhance or even change meaning.
  • Integrate dialogue to convey character and advance action within independent texts.
  • Use a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs.
  • Use further organisational and presentational devices, including headings and bullet points.
  • Be able to write in any given genre showing a clear understanding of techniques and the success criteria.
  • Draft and write independently.
  • Be able to effectively evaluate own writing and that of others and refine and edit texts, responding to feedback.
  • Refine proof reading skills.
  • Pupils will also be taught to write legibly, fluently and with increasing speed.

Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling

  • Be able to use and apply a wider range of punctuation effectively when writing and understand how the different forms can have a differing impact on a text.
  • Use commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity in writing.
  • Use hyphens with increasing accuracy.
  • Use of brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis.
  • Use semi-colons, colons or dashes to mark boundaries between independent clauses.
  • Use a colon to introduce a list.
  • Be confident with prefixes and suffixes and the wide range of spelling rules and guidance to support higher level spelling including silent letters.
  • Know the homophones and other words that are often confused.
  • Follow a spelling programme of study for Y6 (and as suited to pupil‘s needs).
  • Use knowledge of morphology and etymology in spelling and know that some words just need to be learnt specifically.
  • Develop confidence using a dictionary and thesaurus to support when writing.
  • Develop secure understanding of Y6 grammar and be able to apply this when speaking and when writing.

This is the summary of Year 6 English Curriculum. For further detail on content, please click here

Maths

Number

Place Value, ordering and rounding

  • Find the difference between a positive and a negative integer, or two negative integers.
  • Use decimal notation for tenths, hundredths and thousandths; partition, round and order decimals with up to three places, and position them on the number line.
  • Round and order decimals with up to three places, and position them on the number line.
  • Calculate mentally with integers and decimals: U.t +/– U.t, TU × U, TU ÷ U, U.t × U, U.t ÷ U.

Properties of numbers and number sequences

  • Use knowledge of multiplication facts to derive quickly squares of numbers to 12 × 12 and the corresponding squares of multiples of 10.
  • Use approximations, inverse operations and tests of divisibility to estimate and check results.
  • Use knowledge of place value and multiplication facts to 10 × 10 to derive related multiplication and division facts involving decimal numbers, e.g. 0.8 × 7, 4.8 ÷ 6
  • Recognise that prime numbers have only two factors and identify prime numbers less than 100; find the prime factors of two-digit numbers.

Fractions, decimals, %, ratio and proportion

  • Solve simple problems involving direct proportion by scaling quantities up or down.
  • Express a larger whole number as a fraction of a smaller one, e.g. recognise that 8 slices of a 5-slice pizza represents 8/5 or 1 3/5 pizzas; simplify fractions by cancelling common factors; order a set of fractions by converting them to fractions with a common denominator.
  • Express a larger whole number as a fraction of a smaller one, e.g. recognise that 8 slices of a 5-slice pizza represents 8/5 or 1 3/5 pizzas; simplify fractions by cancelling common factors; order a set of fractions by converting them to fractions with a common denominator.
  • Express one quantity as a percentage of another, e.g. express £400 as a percentage of £1000; find equivalent percentages, decimals and fractions.
  • Find fractions and percentages of whole-number quantities, e.g. 5/8 of 96, 65% of £260.

Shape, Space and Measure

Place Value, ordering and rounding

  • Find the difference between a positive and a negative integer, or two negative integers.
  • Use decimal notation for tenths, hundredths and thousandths; partition, round and order decimals with up to three places, and position them on the number line.
  • Round and order decimals with up to three places, and position them on the number line
  • Calculate mentally with integers and decimals: U.t +/– U.t, TU × U, TU ÷ U, U.t × U, U.t ÷ U.

Properties of numbers and number sequences

  • Use knowledge of multiplication facts to derive quickly squares of numbers to 12 × 12 and the corresponding squares of multiples of 10.
  • Use approximations, inverse operations and tests of divisibility to estimate and check results.
  • Use knowledge of place value and multiplication facts to 10 × 10 to derive related multiplication and division facts involving decimal numbers, e.g. 0.8 × 7, 4.8 ÷ 6
  • Recognise that prime numbers have only two factors and identify prime numbers less than 100; find the prime factors of two-digit numbers.

Fractions, decimals, %, ratio and proportion

  • Solve simple problems involving direct proportion by scaling quantities up or down.
  • Express a larger whole number as a fraction of a smaller one, e.g. recognise that 8 slices of a 5-slice pizza represents 8/5 or 1 3/5 pizzas; simplify fractions by cancelling common factors; order a set of fractions by converting them to fractions with a common denominator.
  • Express a larger whole number as a fraction of a smaller one, e.g. recognise that 8 slices of a 5-slice pizza represents 8/5 or 1 3/5 pizzas; simplify fractions by cancelling common factors; order a set of fractions by converting them to fractions with a common denominator.
  • Express one quantity as a percentage of another, e.g. express £400 as a percentage of £1000; find equivalent percentages, decimals and fractions.
  • Find fractions and percentages of whole-number quantities, e.g. 5/8 of 96, 65% of £260.

Data Handling

  • Describe and predict outcomes from data using the language of chance or likelihood.
  • Draw conclusions and identify further questions to ask.
  • Solve problems by collecting, selecting, processing, presenting and interpreting data, using ICT where appropriate.
  • Construct and interpret frequency tables, bar charts with grouped discrete data, and line graphs.
  • Draw conclusions and identify further questions to ask.
  • Suggest, plan and develop lines of enquiry; collect, organise and represent information, interpret results and review methods; identify and answer related questions.
  • Interpret pie charts.
  • Construct and interpret frequency tables, bar charts with grouped discrete data, and line graphs.
  • Describe and interpret results and solutions to problems using the mode, range, median and mean.

Using and Applying

  • Solve multi-step problems, and problems involving fractions, decimals and percentages; choose and use appropriate calculation strategies at each stage.
  • Represent and interpret sequences, patterns and relationships involving numbers and shapes.
  • Suggest and test hypotheses.
  • Construct and use simple expressions and formulae in words then symbols, e.g. the cost of c pens at 15 pence each is 15c pence.
  • Explain reasoning and conclusions, using words, symbols or diagrams as appropriate.

This is the summary of Year 6 Maths Curriculum - for further detail on content, please click here

Science

Forces and Magnets

  • Investigate a variety of forces including magnetism, gravity and friction.
  • Understand that forces have direction and can be measured. This will make it easier for children to apply their knowledge to predict changes in motion which occur when forces act on an object.

Living things and their habitats

  • Know how living things are classified into broad groups according to common observable characteristics and based on similarities and differences including microorganisms, plants and animals.
  • Give reasons for classifying plants and animals based on specific characteristics.

Animals, including humans

  • Identify and name the main parts of the human circulatory system and describe the functions of the heart, blood vessels and blood.
  • Recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and life style on the way their bodies function.
  • Describe the way in which nutrients and water are transported within animals including humans.

Evolution and inheritance

  • Recognise that living things have changed over time and that fossils provide information about living things that inhabited the Earth millions of years ago.
  • Recognise that living things produce offspring of the same kind but normally offspring vary and are not identical to the parents.
  • Identify how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways and that adaptation may lead to evolution.

Light

  • Recognise that light appears to travel in straight lines.
  • Use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain that objects are seen because they give out or reflect light into the eye.
  • Explain that we see things because light travels from light sources to our eyes or from light sources to objects and then to our eyes.
  • Use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain why shadows have the same shape as the objects that cast them.

Electricity

  • Associate the brightness of a lamp where the volume of a buzzer with the number and voltage of cells used in the circuit.
  • Compare and give reasons for variations in how components function including brightness of bulb, the loudness of buzzers, on/off position of switches.
  • Use recognised symbols when representing a simple circuit diagram.

History

  • Develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British and world history.
  • Ancient Greece – a study of life and achievements and their influence on the world.
  • The legacy of Greek culture (art, architecture, literature, food) on later periods of British history including present day.
  • Case study on life during WW2 and the impact of the Holocaust, through written activities and links with the literacy curriculum.
  • Research important discoveries and inventions from the past and their relevance today.
  • Find out about famous innovators whose ideas brought about social change.
  • Discover how our local area has changed and evolved over time.

Geography

  • Extend knowledge and understanding beyond local area and UK to include Europe and the wider world.
  • Locate continents, countries, cities, oceans, coasts, rivers and mountain ranges on a world map.
  • Each class to carry out in depth geographical study of countries including their landmarks, the effects of tourism on economy and the environment.
  • Understand how to be good global citizens.
  • Human geography – trade links throughout the world, economic activities, types of settlement and land use.
  • Physical geography – understand the different climate zones, vegetation and biodiversity of different countries.
  • Use 8 points of compass and six figure grid references (longitude/latitude).

RE & PSHE

  • What is religion?
  • Similarities between different religions.
  • Make informed responses to questions about religion and culture.
  • On a weekly basis pupils will participate fully in ‘Thought for the Week’, discussing quotes and developing their understanding of social, moral, spiritual and cultural issues and encouraging their understanding of British values.
  • They will deepen their understanding of responsibility and keeping safe.
  • They will recognise, predict and assess risk in different situations.
  • They will learn strategies for coping with peer pressure and media influences.
  • The pupils will explore issues including the challenging of stereotypes, diversity and accepting differences.

Computing

Digital Literacy

  • What is the internet? How does the internet work?
  • Making effective searches using internet sites that link to the Topic of study.
  • Cross-curricular projects.
  • Video making - Using Movie-Maker.
  • Designing Travel Guide – Using Publisher.

Computer Science

  • Developing an invention quiz using Power Point.
  • Control - Using Flowol Mimics.
  • Monitoring – using heart monitors & sensors linking to Science.
  • Programming Games – using Scratch.

Information Technology

  • What is Spreadsheet modelling? (Using Ms Excel)
  • Programming software - Scratch to create calculator game.
  • Links to Maths/Science.

Music

  • Pupils will take part in musical activities throughout the year performing in the choir and in school productions.
  • Pupils are given the opportunity to further their musical skills in brass band practice and in cross-curricular projects.

Art & Design

  • To continue to build their Art portfolio to record, review, improve and revisit.
  • To explore a range of art and design techniques including, measurement (2D & 3D designs of European landmarks), sketching using simple & complex shapes, water colour and mixing paint to create tones and shades to create a Blitz scene.
  • To learn about influential European artists including Van Gogh, Pablo Picasso and produce their own interpretation in style of these artists.

Design Technology

  • Understand and use mechanical systems such as gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages in order to make a working model of a design/landmark.
  • To research and develop a design which would be appropriate for the area/environment chosen.
  • Children will create a working prototype.
  • Select the right materials, tools and equipment to complete their landmark design.
  • Wider market evaluation and self-evaluate.

PE

Pupils will consolidate existing skills and gain new ones in athletics, football, gymnastics, dance, rugby, tennis and cricket, recognising the positive impact of physical exercise on health.

  • In football, children will refine their techniques for dribbling, passing, tackling and shooting and learn the match play rules to enable matches to run. Children will hopefully be able to pass and shoot the ball using a half volley, understand the different positions used in football, pass the ball using both feet from different heights, distances and power, understand the importance of keeping possession, use greater control and skill, demonstrate positive teamwork skills, develop a better understanding of different tactics, and show composure when playing under pressure.
  • In gymnastics and dance pupils will create and perform their own fluent sequences on the floor and on apparatus, showing that they can vary speed, level and direction, inspire and enthuse others and be creative and original. They will show they can have a controlled run up and safe landing.
  • In rugby, pupils will understand the importance of a warm up, be able to receive and pass the ball with good control, understand offside rule and be able to respect and enforce rules within a game, show ability to move in line whilst defending, understand and use the 3 s’s effectively.
  • In cricket, children will refine their skills and develop a greater understanding of the rules of this sport, showing that they can play shots off their front and back feet, demonstrating a good understanding of fielding positions, use short barrier technique for running in and picking up the cricket ball, bowling over arm with growing accuracy, hitting and catching the ball at different heights and positions.
  • In athletics, there are opportunities for children to experience a wide range of track and field events - learning the key techniques needed in order to run faster or jump/throw further and for them to challenge themselves to beat their personal bests.

Languages

  • Children will continue to develop their basic understanding of the French language and how to convey opinions when asked simple questions. They will also be able to discuss countries and travel.
  • In a further link to their Topic work they will specifically be looking at useful holiday phrases relating to travel and transport. Children will also develop their writing skills in French using new vocabulary acquired.